11

Dozens help rebuild Land’s End Labyrinth

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Thanks to all the volunteers that joined Land’s End labyrinth caretaker Colleen Yerge, and its original creator Eduardo Aguilera, to help rebuild it on Sunday. The labyrinth had been vandalized – all the rocks had been thrown over the cliff’s edge – back in August.

Roughly 200 people came out to help build and within a couple of hours, all the rocks had been carted up from Mile Rock beach below and laid on the labyrinth’s borders.

It looks great! Well done, labyrinth lovers.

Sarah B.

[via SFGate]

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo: Susana Bates, Special To The Chronicle

Photo by Eugene Kim

Photo by Eugene Kim

Photo by Eugene Kim

Photo by Eugene Kim

11 Comments

  1. And so, it is reasonable to ask at this point what will be done to prevent the vandalism from happening again? As I recall, this is not the first time this has happened.

    I hate to be the proverbial turd in the punchbowl, but the mural in the Mission was vandalized and redone three or four times. The people (person?) who did this are probably aware that this has been rebuilt, and are probably awaiting just the right moment on a foggy cold night when no one is around to come out and do this.

    May I suggest:
    1) a motion-sensitive light, similar to ones installed in people’s backyards that activate when there is motion, perhaps installed on the cliffs behind the labyrinth, and
    2) a motion-sensitive camera of some sort, installed next to it. Both could be battery powered, and the batteries could be renewed every month or so.

    And I would suspect that anyone who would want to vandalize this amazing work might do so not long after it’s been installed, so you wouldn’t need to keep the equipment there for very long…just to either deter anyone from doing it or catching them in the act. Because it would be a real shame if this amazing work were to be destroyed so quickly after being rebuilt, like the Mission murals were.

  2. @J – I think Colleen’s approach to the possibility of vandalism is more zen than that. Take a look at her response in the initial post about the vandalism (http://richmondsfblog.com/2015/08/18/photo-lands-end-labyrinth-erased/). The Park Service is not going to bother to invest in a system to protect it (and honestly, even allowing this to exist on their property is uncharacteristic of them) so here’s hoping that humans respect it. And if they don’t, it will get rebuilt by those who care about it being there for all of us.

  3. @J: I don’t mean to be abrupt, but…it’s a public park, and this installation is not really supposed to be there in the first place. So nobody is installing any motion sensors! I think people are having a hard time understanding what the parks are for. You need to come and enjoy it, but leave no trace. They are supposed to be for everybody, not for individuals’ art projects.

  4. One major inaccuracy in that SFGate.com piece: There were at least 200 people who showed up over the course of the morning. It was pretty incredible.

  5. @Eugene – That is incredible! Thanks for clarifying, I updated our post here.
    Sarah B.

  6. GREAT PHOTOS. It’s true, sadly, I heard that it’s possible the park rangers themselves may destroy such things found because it’s technically against regulations. However, much like swings and playgrounds, or old conservatories and eucalyptus trees, there are clearly many who support the existence of the labyrinth and perhaps the COMMUNITY should be allowed a voice to make it official at this point?

    I want to add though, “J”, that I was alarmed at how quickly a man tagging things “no more chinese” was arrested and publicly outed (with nary an explanation to the senior citizen’s motive — wrong-headed as it was), meanwhile the vandalism of the Latino gay pride mural (strictly the male/male side btw) was left a mystery. I do understand the complications involved, just an interesting distinction.

  7. ofc no one cares those rocks block the walking path. shit like this is predictable SF in the worst way. kudos to the ppl CLEARING the path. pls keep your hippie hogwash out of public parks.

Comments are closed.